Pam goes PUBLIC in 2018: Seattle Playwrights Salon, Poetrybridge, Drunken Owl Theatre & Loud Mouth Lit!

January started with a bang–fireworks and a Seattle Playwrights Salon reading of Unhinged at The Conservatory and ended with another bang–a Loud Mouth Lit reading of flash fiction at St. Andrew’s Bar and Grill. February brought a reading of Nesting Ground by Drunken Owl Theatre at The Parliament Tavern.

Here’s what’s coming up:

APRIL 13 … April Shorts by Washington Women Playwrights at The Conservatory by Seattle Playwrights Salon … Let Go Now, featuring Julia Beers and Nikki Visel.

APRIL 29 … Drunken Owl Theatre will read Three Sane Women at The Parliament Tavern.parl

JUNE 13 … I am featured reader with Samanthe Sheffer and Stacey P. Danner at C & P Coffee for Poetrybridge.

 

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Maggie Rogers Directs!

http://www.rogersmaggie.com/about/

I am excited to meet the director for the reading of my one-act play, Nesting Ground, by Macha Monkey Distillery Series March 28 at Gay City Arts, Seattle.

Give Me a Stranger

Recently Juliet Waller Pruzan asked me if there was someone I had in mind to direct my one-act comedy, Nesting Ground. Macha Monkey soon will assemble a cast and director for the reading.

Nope.

Here’s why I don’t want a director I know, even if I love her or him. I want to see how someone who doesn’t know me or my work looks at my script. I want to see how I am seen by a stranger.

I trust the folks at Macha Monkey to introduce me to yet another stellar Seattle director–not that this person can be more honest than Lenore Bensinger or more learned than Omar Willey. I’ve loved the directors with whom I have been lucky enough to have been matched.

Whoever you are, I look forward to meeting you, and learning, from your perspective, what fails and what succeeds in this play.

Macha Monkey supports and believes in fostering new plays and specifically new plays that feature strong female characters. Our Distillery series is an opportunity for playwrights to gain valuable feedback from Seattle audiences. It is also a platform for audiences to help shape new works in process. Every reading is followed by discussion of the play and a celebration of emerging pieces of theatre.

The Distillery is a free series. We do suggest a $5 donation at the door to help Macha Monkey pay for script copies and space rental. Thank you for supporting fearless, funny, female theatre!

2016 -2017 Plays

All readings: 7PM at the Calamus Auditorium at Gay City, 517 E. Pike St., Seattle.

November 22

Scott Herman, Pluggedin

January 24

Paul Lewis, The Names

February 28

Rachel Atkins, Out of Time

March 28

Pamela Carter, Nesting Ground, and Stacy Flood, the law of universal gravitation, as deduced from observation

April 25

Maggie Lee, Sheathed

May 30

Matt Smith, The Hanford Invasion!

Why Read MINDING THE MUSE, A Handbook for Painters, Composers, Writers, and Other Creators by Priscilla Long, if you have read The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron, and such?

Minding the Muse, A Handbook for Painters, Composers, Writers, and Other Creators by Priscilla Long, Coffeetown Press, Seattle, 2016

Priscilla Long’s slim handbook for artists suggests ways to reflect on one’s creativity and so become a more effective creator. It is pithier and more intellectually respectful than recent creativity how-tos like Elizabeth Gilbert’s Big Magic, and old standards like Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way.

If the topic of creativity interests you, you may have read Nancy Andreasen, Julia Cameron, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Mason Currey, Elizabeth Gilbert, Rollo May, Roger van Oech, Stephen Saitzyk, Dorothy L. Sayers, Blake Snyder, and Twyla Tharp, and wish to know how Priscilla Long’s 2016 handbook from Coffeetown Press distinguishes itself.

Long promotes hard purposeful work and asks readers to figure out for themselves how they can become more productive. She labels her book an “aid … in this process of reflection.” The happy results of her handbook: more thoughtful artwork and more thoughtful artists.

Unlike Julia Cameron, Priscilla Long ignores aspects of us that are none of her business. Although Cameron acknowledges her readers might not believe in God, she bases much of The Artist’s Way on the deity notion. A person wishing to skip those references has many passages to hop. There is no such fat in Minding the Muse. Like Blake Snyder (Save the Cat), Long cuts to the practical while remaining thorough. Each of her fourteen chapters ends with “Questions to Contemplate as You Continue Your Practice.” While Minding the Muse is a quick read, contemplating Long’s questions and implementing her ideas could take the rest of an artist’s life. And readers will want to reread. Handbooks are to be kept at hand, after all.

Enthusiastic Elizabeth Gilbert (Big Magic) assumes we need seventy pages of cheerleading before creating anything. Priscilla Long believes her readership is already ambitious. Gilbert provides no significant deepening of an understanding of the creative process. In contrast, Minding the Muse distills Long’s extensive research on productive creators “from Picasso to Patti Smith …” down to the most helpful processes for furthering even an experienced creator’s practice. We improve our chances at being our best creator selves if we apply the most successful practices to our own. And as Long says, “No matter how experienced I get, there’s something more to learn.”

Gilbert and Cameron can come across as new-agey. Long is classic. Never new-agey. Twyla Tharp (The Creative Habit, The Creativity in Each of Us) is also classic. Tharp’s ideas about creativity include wacky practices, such as unsticking oneself by assuming the egg position—a fetal tuck, eyes closed—until breakthrough, and standards, such as launching into a ritual to initiate the creative day. Tharp and Long make a great duo for creators interested in reflective practice.

How-to authors tell readers to set “specific and reachable” goals. Long is no exception. She stands apart by adding, “A goal is a product, such as a painting or a poem. It’s not a process.” Thus, announcing, “I am going to paint for two hours every day this week,” is not goal-setting; “I am going to paint a landscape every week this month,” is. Her definition changes the creative equation. It is not about hours+hours=terrific(?)new art. It is closer to hours+purpose=potential fulfilled.

Some of Minding the Muse’s practices ring familiar, such as ignoring mood and learning the habit of work, (Chapter V, “Feelings Are Unimportant”). But some of the practices surprise, such as contemplating: “What artworks might you study outside the traditions of your own art form?” and “Do you work on more than one piece at once?” In my favorite, Chapter VII, “Creativity Heuristics for Artists,” Long posits quirky things for creators to do within their own works, such as lateral moves, “… techniques … devised to move sideways, to invite in the non-obvious, to create more associations, to generate ideas and create works, to think divergently.” Some practices inspire, as in Chapter XI, “Accounting for Works.” Long suggests artists inventory their work. Have you seen this suggestion anywhere else? Whatever your medium of creation, try the works list. You will gain a fresh perspective on how you have spent your time over the years, and on how you may move forward.

Chuck Smart’s gorgeous The Painters Hand decorates the cover of Minding the Muse. It is a fitting visual synecdoche of creativity.

Macha Monkey Distillery Season:

November 22nd-Scott Herman “Pluggedin”
January 24th-Paul Lewis “The Names”
February 28th-Rachel Atkins “Out of Time”
March 28th-Pamela Carter “Nesting Ground” and Stacy Flood “the law of universal gravitation, as deduced from observation”
April 25th-Maggie Lee- title TBA
May 30th-Matt Smith-“The Hanford Invasion!”
The readings are all taking place at the Calamus Auditorium at Gay City Arts at 517 E. Pike again this year. Readings start at 7:00.

The Distillery

(From Macha Monkey’s site)
“Macha Monkey supports and believes in fostering new plays and specifically new plays that feature strong female characters. Our Distillery series is an opportunity for playwrights to gain valuable feedback from Seattle audiences. It is also a platform for audiences to help shape new works in process. Every reading is followed by discussion of the play and a celebration of emerging pieces of theatre.

The Distillery is a free series. We do suggest a $5 donation at the door to help Macha Monkey pay for script copies and space rental. Thank you for supporting fearless, funny, female theatre!”

 

How Shameless is Self-Promotion that Few will See?

I hope you are an artistic director looking for your theater’s next script.

I hope you are a theater teacher looking for practice monologues for your students.

I hope you are an actor looking for audition material. (Break a leg!)

I hope you are a friend looking for new points of connection.

Please, let me know who you are.

 

I’m a geologist by training. At field camp (an undergraduate requirement) I learned how to make geological maps and how to keep a field notebook. It was wonderful to have professors ask us to track measurements, diagram rock structure, record the weather, and pinpoint our locations in our notebooks–and then read our notebooks. Our notebooks proved authorship of the maps. It was all so satisfying.

Whether I get many eyeballs here, or few, my geology-trained side has had the satisfaction of pulling together a portfolio.

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Testing a playwright website

Move slower, I tell myself. Breathe, I tell myself. My new year’s resolution of 2014 was not to get wigged out by tech stuff. I’ve kept it pretty well until now (8/2016), but this web design is putting it to the test. One day soon there may be a playwright website here. Until then, here’s a photo by Omar Willey from Centrifuge featuring (left to right,) Meenakshi Rishi, Lenore Bensinger, Genevieve Wanucha, and yours truly, Pamela Hobart Carter

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Photos by Omar Willey and Joe Iano